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Plant Comments
orchid
Masdevallia ignea

The wonderfully coloured flowers need really cool temperatures so they sit in the open air May through September. I bought several over the years and though they survived quite well in the greenhouse they have only started flowering regularly since I have put them outside.

From Iain Wright on 27th July 2020
orchid
Masdevallia ignea

Like all Massdevallias, what you see here are the sepals. The petals are very small and hardly visible in the back of the flower.

From Iain Wright on 27th July 2020
orchid
Coelogyne pulverula

(This Coelogyne can have a pendulous inflorescence up to a metre long in the wilds of Malaysia, Thailand, Borneo, Java and Sumatra. iain)

From Cath Stevens on 26th July 2020
orchid
Coelogyne pulverula

(Click here for a picture from Mount Kinabalu in Borneo. The plant is often sold as C. dayana iain)

From Cath Stevens on 26th July 2020
orchid
Promenea citrina

I got this plant from the OSGB auction in January 2015. I have not yet repotted it which is why it is not in a black pot. I had tried for many year to grow plants of this genus but they always rotted off - often immediately. This one has never been watered from above which I think is the secret of this success.

From Iain Wright on 22nd July 2020
orchid Llynclys Common

We went for a walk on Llynclys Common with Denys on a slightly dull day.
If you have very sharp eyesight, you will spot something interesting in the foreground!

From Iain Wright on 21st July 2020
orchid Llynclys Common
Dactylorhiza fuchsii

D. fuchsii is one of the very common native orchids but always a pleasure to find.

From Iain Wright on 21st July 2020
orchid Seen on a Llynclys gatepost ...
The mind boggles!

From Iain Wright on 21st July 2020
orchid Llynclys Common
Anacamptis pyramidalis

Quietly lurking in the undergrowth? The Pyramidal Orchid will form large colonies in open ground but is a bit more discreet in long grass.

From Iain Wright on 21st July 2020
orchid Sweeney Fen
This is a nature reserve run by Shropshire Wildlife Trust, about three miles south of Oswestry. It is small as fens go but even after our dry Spring and Early Summer, it was squelchy in a lot of places; water proof shoes essential.
I did not expect to see too much this late in the season but I was in for a surprise.

From Iain Wright on 21st July 2020
orchid Sweeney Fen
Gymnadenia densiflora

A few years ago there was only one Fragrant Orchid, Gymnadenia conopsea, but after examination of its DNA it was split into three separate species. The other are two are the Chalk and the Heath Fragrant Orchids, G. conopsea and borealis respectively.

From Iain Wright on 21st July 2020
orchid Sweeney Fen
Gymnadenia densiflora

They are not easy to distinguish - but this is a marsh after all!

From Celia Wright on 21st July 2020
orchid Sweeney Fen
Epipactis palustris

This is the Marsh Helleborine. I am used to seeing this in coastal dune slacks where it is at most 10cm high. Finding these 25cm tall plants makes them feel slightly unreal.

From Iain Wright on 21st July 2020
orchid Sweeney Fen
Epipactis palustris



From Iain Wright on 21st July 2020
orchid Sweeney Fen
Dactylorhiza sp

Flourishing amidst the verdant Mares Tail - a kill on sight weed in our garden - this is probably D. incarnata, the Broad Leafed Marsh Orchid. It has achieved very good pollination.

From Iain Wright on 21st July 2020
orchid
Phalaenopsis

This has been in flower for several months now.

From Cath Stevens on 30th June 2020
orchid
Brassia verrucosa Sea Serpent

This is grown intermediate.

From Cath Stevens on 30th June 2020